Tag Archives: SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP

The Feast in NYC- A Social Entrepreneurship Event

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:

Jerri Chou

All Day Buffet

617.470.9478

jerri@alldaybuffet.org

Social Entrepreneurship Event Brings Together the Best

For-Good For-Profit Ideas

Quick pitch competition brings together most innovative individuals to share, act, and invest in long-term change.

New York– (September, 2009) – On October 2, New York-based company All Day Buffet will assemble the world’s most socially minded investors, venture philanthropists and press for a cutting edge quick pitch competition in New York. The Kitchen will feature the most innovative for-good for-profit entrepreneurs looking to make the world a better place. Each venture will be have five minutes to pitch in front of industry-leading judges, speakers and an audience full of investors, entrepreneurs, and press.

An event the focuses on solving the world’s problems through creativity and business, The Kitchen is a part of Feast Social Innovation Conference – a cross disciplinary event that highlights the most creative ways of addressing the world’s most pressing issues. Part of the new social entrepreneurship movement, The Kitchen seeks to bring together leaders in the burgeoning space of socially responsible investment and business.

“For much too long, there’s been an irrational divide between doing business and doing good,” said Jerri Chou, Co-founder of All Day Buffet. “We want the world to see that sometimes, you can actually do more good and see more returns—social and otherwise—by investing in inherently good companies than by traditional “giving.”

Speakers, Judges and Presenters at The Kitchen include:

SPEAKERS:

Nathaniel Whittmore, Change.org & Assetmap

Nathaniel Whittemore is the co-founder of Assetmap Strategies, a company that builds web tools to better help people leverage and share the resources that exist within their personal and professional networks. Previously, he was the founder of the Center for Global Engagement, a global service learning program design center at Northwestern University, from which he graduated in 2006. He writes about social entrepreneurship and innovation on Change.org and is fascinated by the ways in which the net generation are reshaping activism, careerism, and the pursuit of meaning.

Diana Ayton-Shenker, Fast Forward Fund

founder of Fast Forward Fund (FFF) and of Global Momenta, Diana Ayton-Shenker, focuses on accountability and impact through strategic philanthropy, corporate social responsibility and private-nonprofit partnerships. She brings 20 years of experience working with international organizations, private and corporate foundations, the U.N. and academia, to help leaders be more effective in affecting social change. Ms. Ayton-Shenker has held senior positions with Mercy Corps, PEN, Human Rights Watch, and has served on the board of several nonprofit organizations.

David Blumenstein, Hatchery.vc

David Blumenstein has made his mark as a technology strategist with broad skills across diverse technology platforms.  David brings his unparalleled network of technology leaders to The Hatchery and as well as his extensive experience in strategic and tactical deployment of new technologies, and background in advertising, marketing and finance.  Prior to The Hatchery, David was the Managing Director of Tekworks, specializing in Talent Management and Recruitment, CTO of EURO RSCG/MVMBS, Director of Technology for Ogilvy Interactive and Systems Analyst for Salomon Brothers.

JUDGES:

Eric Friedman, Union Square Ventures

Eric Friedman is a net native originally from New York City. Eric has a background in information technology and advertising and has blended this skill set within his entrepreneurial pursuits. Eric began his career with his own IT consulting practice in high school, followed by joining an Internet Startup in 1999. Soon after graduating from George Washington University in 2004 with a B.B.A. in Marketing, Eric joined Grey Advertising. In 2006 Eric joined Reprise Media as an Account Manager specializing in SEM, SEO, and Social Media services.  Eric can be found blogging at www.marketing.fm

Bryan Birsic, Village Ventures

Prior to joining Village Ventures in 2007, Bryan started his career as a consultant at Bain & Company’s New York office. While at Bain, he advised Fortune 500 clients in the healthcare, financial services, consumer products and media industries on a variety of strategic issues including M&A, competitive positioning and adjacency growth. Bryan also worked in Bain’s private equity group performing due diligence on potential buyout targets. Bryan holds a B.A. in Political Economy from Williams College, where he graduated Phi Beta Kappa. Bryan lives in New York, NY and is active with local community organizations Big Brother Big Sister and City Year. While at Bain, Bryan founded and led an organization to significantly reduce the environmental impact of Bain’s operations that was featured in Forbes. He remains active in the organization in an advisory role and has also consulted other services companies on aligning responsible environmental practice with positive brand and financial outcomes. Bryan is a board observer for Babble and Extreme Reach.

Josh Cohen, City Light Capital

Josh Cohen is the Managing Partner of City Light Capital. Prior to creating CLCM, Josh co-founded City Light Capital (the predecessor fund to CLCM), which invested in and managed a portfolio of double bottom line companies. He is currently on the Board of Rotomotion and is an Observer to the Boards of Shotspotter and ImageSpan. He was formerly an Observer to the Board of Arxceo before it was acquired by JCI Group. Josh had previous venture capital experience working with a family office in St. Louis and the SV Group, a private debt fund.

Deb Parsons, Investors’ Circle

Deb currently serves as Co-Director for Investors’ Circle, emphasizing on Business Development, Membership, and Strategic Partnerships. Deb joins IC after being a member for 4 years at two member funds, SJF Ventures and Good Capital. For the past two years, she was Vice President at Good Capital, launching and managing the fund’s operational aspects, investor relations, and deployment of capital. Deb was an associate at SJF Ventures during business school, a community development venture fund focusing on cleantech and the LOHAS sector. Prior to school, she spent six years in business development, marketing, and partner management at WGGH, Intuit, and the North Face. Deb received her MBA from Kenan Flagler Business School, UNC_Chapel Hill, where she was a Carolina Venture Fellow with a focus on sustainable enterprise and entrepreneurship. As the Net Impact chapter leader, Deb launched the Sustainable Venture Capital Investment Competition (SVCIC), an event that puts MBA student teams in the role of VCs evaluating real business opportunities of socially-responsible businesses actively seeking capital. Raised in St. Louis, MO, Deb now calls San Francisco home.

STARTUP FINALISTS (MORE TO COME):

Michael Mossoba, Goodness500.org

Goodness500 makes it easy for people to learn which corporations are the most socially responsible.

Nicole Betancourt, Parent Earth

Connects busy parents to the newest and best ideas for raising healthy children on a sustainable and equitable planet.

Jose Serrano-Reyes, Trust Art

Trust Art is a social platform that is commissioning ten public artworks over the next year.

Marco Puccia, International Transperency Solutions

International Transparency Solutions is a startup company designed to connect investors and the developing world.

Monaqui Porter Young, Srina

Srina tea is 100% organically grown, hand-plucked, packaged and produced on a small scale farm in a rainforest in Sri Lanka.

Eli Halliwell, VotaVox

VotaVox collects opinions from voters around the world on issues that are meaningful to them.

Breatt Beach, Madecasse

Madécasse chocolate is the only chocolate produced bean to bar on the island of Madagascar.

TICKETS:

Regular Ticket $99.00

Startup Ticket $50.00

Purchase online at http://feastkitchen.eventbrite.com/

WHEN:

Friday, October 2, 2009

8:30 AM – 12:30 PM

WHERE:

Tribeca Grand Hotel

2 Avenue of the Americas

New York, NY

MORE INFO:

http://feastongood.com/

http://feastongood.com/conference/kitchen/

# # #

About All Day Buffet:

Changing the world through creativity and business. We put things into the world that make it a better place. For more information, visit www.alldaybuffet.org.

About The Feast:

The Feast is a cross-disciplinary series of programs addressing social innovation and new ways to make the world a better place. Culminating in a conference on Oct 1. The Feast Conference gathers the world’s greatest innovators from across industries and society to empower, inspire and engage each other in creating world-shaking change. For more information, visit http://feastongood.com/

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Filed under SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Foundations Listen Up: Why PRI’s and L3C’s Matter

Whenever I see something that looks GREAT, I wonder if I am missing something…You know, the old; “Too good to be true”. Over the last many months, I have been doing due diligence on the most appropriate corporate structure for a film project I am working on called “Time To Impact”. The film has a social agenda; use the film to inspire philanthropy, social entrepreneurship, and civic engagement to turn around Paterson, NJ, the third largest city in the state and one of the poorest in the nation in 365 days.

The biggest concern is raising money for the film project. I wondered whether I should set up as a for profit or nonprofit. Going the for profit route didn’t seem to feel good. For one thing, I didn’t want to have a perception that we were doing this just to make money. In addition, I wasn’t comfortable being the guy who says; “Oh, this is going to be the greatest thing since An Inconvenient Truth and Supersize Me. The appeal isn’t in how MUCH people can make, but for the benefit that the film will have from a social standpoint. The pure for profit model just didn’t feel right. On the other hand, setting up a nonprofit involves setting up a 501(c)3, a process that takes many months, requires a board of directors, and other things that just seemed to be a distraction from the main goal at hand. Compound those issues with the fact that we are in a very difficult fund raising environment, we are likely to be grouped with everyone else asking for money, the grant process itself is a labor intensive process, and getting access to for profit money is less likely (if not eliminated), and the nonprofit model also didn’t seem to fit. Months of contemplation on this, and still no decision. Recently, I started taking a closer look at L3C’s.

The more I learned about L3C’s, the more attractive they looked for our film project. Over the last month or so, I have had discussions about my project with some of the top minds in country on the L3C. They seem to agree. This seems to be the perfect fit. So what’s so great?

L3C’s are hybrids of for-profit and nonprofit entities. They are a for-profit company that first and foremost has a social agenda, and making money secondarily. This seemed to address my concern about the issue of perception of my motivation of “doing this just for money”. My understanding is, there are no limits to the profit, as long as the mission is socially oriented. Second, and what I perceive as most beneficial and cutting edge, is the fact that L3C’s automatically qualify as “Program Related Investments” (or PRI’s) for foundations. This is a big deal. Why?

According to Foundation Center, Program-related investments (PRIs) are investments made by foundations to support charitable activities that involve the potential return of capital within an established time frame. PRIs include financing methods commonly associated with banks or other private investors, such as loans, loan guarantees, linked deposits, and even equity investments in charitable organizations or in commercial ventures for charitable purposes.”

So what does that mean? It means a lot. Foundations are required by the IRS to give away 5% of their assets each year in order to maintain their tax status with the IRS. Traditionally, this 5% takes the form of grants to 501(c)3 charities (the kind we would have been). As a Certified Financial Planner™ Professional, I look at the 5% requirement this way. Starting with 100 percent of the foundation’s investment portfolio, 5% is given away. Those grants hopefully are being given out to worthy causes who will “invest” the money effectively and use it prudently, however it is difficult to determine what the “social return on investment” actually is because in many cases it is difficult to measure the actual social return. I could write another entire column on just that subject alone, but let’s not go there right now. So what is the actual social return on investment of the 5% money? Enter the L3C.

L3C’s are businesses just like any other. Good ones should have a tight business plan and expectation that they are going to earn a profit or else they would not exist. If a business goes to a bank for a loan, the bank wants to know what the likelihood the loan is going to be repaid. That is determined largely on the strength of the business. The BIG deal with the L3C and for the foundation, is that a foundation can invest in the L3C and has the opportunity to actually earn a return on the money. Better yet, the foundation’s investment into a PRI (L3C), COUNTS toward the 5% they must give away each year. Ok let’s stop and recap now.

From a purely capitalistic “non social” viewpoint for a second, the 5% given away represents a 100% loss (looking at it strictly as an investment). Foundations give to good causes which is why they are able to get a tax deduction for the contributions when money is put into them.

If a foundation has an opportunity to earn a return on money and get it back to give again by investing in profitable social business ventures, AND it counts toward money they must give away anyway, why aren’t more foundations doing this?

In an environment of depressed investment portfolios, isn’t this a wise thing do do?

Worst case, the investment doesn’t make money and you lose your investment. Consider it a grant, which is what you are already doing anyway.

Am I missing something here?

If I have piqued your interest, watch the video below. (I’m “The Philanthropic Advisor” in the trailer)


Foundations, let’s make a difference and turn around a city. Please consider helping us fund this film. Email me at rich@timetoimpact.com to inquire.

Join the Movement:

Time To Impact Website

Facebook Fan Page

Time To Impact on Twitter @ImpactMovie

Richard J. Krasney on Twitter @PhilanthropyCFP

Richard J. Krasney on LinkedIn

By the way, nothing in this should be considered legal or financial advice and you should not rely on my opinions or the information expressed here in place of doing your own due diligence. Consult your financial professional before making any important financial decisions. This is just my opinion. End CYA.


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Filed under ECONOMY, FOUNDATIONS, INVESTING, NON-PROFIT & CHARITY, SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP, strategic philanthropy, TAX

Philanthropic Analysis Paralysis

Face it, many of us “wonks” (which I lovingly use) in the philanthropic sector have become enamored with being able to measure things. We also like to complain a lot when we can’t measure something.

Lately, all of the talk has been on the various ways to measure an organizational outcome. Under Ken Berger’s leadership, Charity Navigator has set a new course and begun studying ways to incorporate measurement of outcomes into their charity rating system. I applaud Ken and Charity Navigator and believe that for too long, we have not been focusing donor attention on the entire picture. It is inherently good to ask the question, “How effective have you been at actually achieving the thing we’ve been giving you money for?”. To be able to create mechanisms that address that question could potentially have a huge impact and be a game changing moment for the nonprofit sector.

In my work as an investment adviser, I choose investments to put money into. For the most part, I frankly don’t care how much a company spent on advertising expenses or other overhead costs, I care about their earnings. I care about their dividend. I care whether the company is growing or contracting. I care how much market share they have relative to their competitors. These and other things tell me how healthy a company is. While it is useful to compare the overhead of Home Depot to Lowes, it is pointless in my opinion to compare it to Johnson & Johnson if you are interested in the metrics of the home improvement business. They do completely different things. Measuring the right things is something that we’ve done a poor job at and it seems like good people are committed to making real improvements to how we track effectiveness. This is long overdue. Have we missed something along the way though?

When I first started becoming interested in philanthropy as part of my business, I wanted to help charities tell the planned giving story. When I went to become a Certified Financial Planner™ Professional, I saw the tax wizardry of Charitable Remainder Trusts and was amazed when I saw that one could potentially leave more money to heirs through the use of these and other kinds of charitable vehicles. I thought, “Wow, why doesn’t everyone know about this?” I felt that many more people would give to charity if they knew what kind of tax benefit they could get and that if heirs actually wound up receiving more in the process, well that would certainly be a win for everyone but the government. Over time, I learned that while many people do give for tax reasons, more give because they are inspired to do so for one reason or another. They give from their heart. They give to give something back or to make a difference.

While the measurement issue is a critical one, let’s not lose sight of the fact that we also need to be focused on showing people the way into philanthropy. We need to be creating opportunities to make new philanthropists by showing the world that we all make a difference and have the ability to do so. I discovered philanthropy. A business coach asked me to write my own eulogy. After a few minutes of sitting there, staring at him, and thinking about the question, I answered. I said, “I guess I would want people to say I made a difference…” The rest is history.

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Filed under ESTATE PLANNING, FINANCIAL PLANNING, FOUNDATIONS, NON-PROFIT & CHARITY, SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP

5 Ways I’m Using Twitter to Meet the Right People

Ok, so I joined twitter about 3 weeks ago and while and I’m still finding my way around, I think I’ve picked up a few things that might help people. While it’s fun to use and completely different than any of the other social networking sites like LinkedIn or Facebook, ultimately I’m there to meet new contacts for my business. I wouldn’t think this would come as a surprise to anyone, but there do seem to be quite a number of people there for social reasons. Since I’m there for business purposes, here’s what I’ve done to get over 800 followers in 3 weeks. As with anything, Twitter is what you make of it so you have to invest some time to get results.

  1. If you are there for business, post things that will be interesting to the people you want to connect with. Sometimes I’m a bit of a ham, but I let that come through in some of my posts even when they are unrelated to business. That’s me, I’m a ham sometimes and I just can’t stand not sharing the fact that both of my identical twins projectile spit-up on me almost the same time. Frankly that’s what makes it fun. All work and no play makes Rich a dull boy. I’m a real person and I let my Twitter follower people know it.
  2. If someone you are following posts something interesting, RT it (Retweet it). That means that “Hey, I just liked what you posted, so I’m sharing that with my own followers. When you do that, it let’s people know you are not just interested in having a one way conversation saying “hey everyone, look how great I am”.
  3. Follow people with similar interests. Don’t worry, if you follow someone they won’t think you’re stalking them. That’s what this is all about.
  4. If you follow someone with similar interests, look to see who they follow and follow those people too. This is how you expand your network. The more people with similar interests you follow, the more likely you are to be found by people you want to meet.
  5. Use Google to help you find people you want to meet. Instead of doing a standard search in Google, use the “Advanced Search” feature, then select “Search within a website”. Choose Twitter.com and type the search terms you are interested in. Example:

In my case, I want to meet successful social entrepreneurs, Philanthropists, CEO’s/ Business Owners, and Non-Profits. I go into Google, hit “Advanced Search”, then type “BIO Social Entrepreneur”.

Most of the Google results that come up are Twitter profiles with Social Entrepreneur in their bios. Click through the Google results one by one and see who interests you. Follow the people who interest you. If you are talking about the same kinds of things, odds are they will follow you back.

Ultimately, I believe that there are people within my areas of interest who will be looking for someone to help them with their wealth management needs. You can’t come right out and say that and people just don’t like to talk about money (especially now). Developing contacts is about developing trust. Using Twitter allows you to develop relationships and stay in touch with the people who you are interested in meeting and who are interested in hearing from you. Whether that winds up driving people to explore my services is another story.

Chime in with suggestions or send me a DM @PhilathropyCFP (Direct Message for you non-Twitter folk).

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Do Something’s CEO, Nancy Lublin Certainly Did: Dangers of A Rant in Fast Company Magazine

Wow, how I DO LOVE a good rant! We all need to vent once in a while and I think that the non-profit sector is as good a place to take a shot these days as as any. For those who relish a good rant, and I am certainly one of them, (see the rant I posted “You Call Yourself a Social Entrepreneur?” here http://tinyurl.com/bau5dv I say “rant away”, with caution.

On January 13, 2009, Fast Company Magazine published an article by Nancy Lublin, founder of the non-profit  “Do Something”, and President of Dressed For Success, a group that helps women find work. The article “Nonprofits? Not a Recessionary Refuge for Job Seekers”, seems to have touched of a torrent of angry comments from readers because of the harsh tone she used to describe what seemed to be an endless stream of people coming to her looking for advice on how to make move from the greedy for-profit world into the caring non-profit world. Lublin states; “I take these meetings out of the goodness of my unnaturally large heart, which should be considered a handicap.” and Your Harvard MBA won’t make me drool. Twenty percent of my staff graduated from Ivies — and we’re not the smartest people on the team.” While I’m just reporting the news here, ok fine, i’ll give my opinion…I think she might have crossed the line based on the comments she received. The tone did have a somewhat hard feel to it.

I have a great amount of respect for anyone who has enough passion to start an organization to help other people. There are a number of things that non-profits must deal with that the for profit world does not. As Nancy points out, marketing for one is very difficult on a shoestring budget. While we who serve the donor community have demanded more accountability from non-profits in controlling and being responsible for things like administrative expenses and excessive executive compensation, many of us feel that non-profits have their hands tied when it comes to spending money to make money or to ultimately deliver results. We have become focused on the wrong metrics. We focus on expenses and administrative costs, instead of measuring outcomes. In our attempt to make non-profits be more accountable, we have in many respects, tied their hands and made it more difficult to accomplish their mission. I think that Nancy’s article in Fast Company was in many ways, a rant about being frustrated that they are forced to play by a different set of rules. That’s my take anyway. Nancy, I hear ya but it appears that a lot of people either took what you were saying the wrong way (as sometimes happens), or they just didn’t like hearing it in that tone of voice.

So where do I come off having an opinion on this?  I help successful folks figure out how to make the financial leap into doing more meaningful things in their life (what Nancy was talking about). Often this includes social entrepreneurship related activities, thinking about volunteer or opportunities to give money/time, starting a private foundation, or something else that is not about self, rather doing for others. Without further clarification from Nancy Lubin, I’m afraid she’s done a real injustice to herself and possibly alienated good people who wanted her help to move to a more meaningful career. My rant on social entrepreneurship a few weeks ago was designed to inspire people to “Do Something”, just as Nancy says, but unfortunately, after reading this, it seems many folks might not be interested in doing anything for “Do Something”. Perhaps it might help for her to clarify what she wrote, or perhaps that’s exactly how she feels. Stay tuned. I just love a good rant.

Here’s the article from Fast Company

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Filed under NON-PROFIT & CHARITY, SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP

You Call Yourself a Social Entrepreneur? I Have A Dream-Begin Rant

Frankly, I’m a little sick and tired of hearing about social entrepreneurs. Generally speaking, we as a community do a good deal of talking about helping others, but at the end of the day there are too few people stepping up and actually doing anything concrete. Now that we’re deep in the throws of an economic downturn, people like Thomas Friedman of the NY Times are asking questions like “Does the economic downturn spell the end of the green movement?” What do you think? I love Tom Friedman and I don’t believe that the economic environment will be more than a blip on the socially conscious movement in the long run. It’s a great question and one that will sell lots of books and attention though. Nice one again Tom, love ya.

Back to my rant though…What’s the deal people? What the hell is a “socially conscious” movement anyway? Perhaps “movement” IS the right word as in “crap“. Are we all full of it? Perhaps we should call it a “socially UNconscious” movement. I mean, really, what is social entrepreneurship anyway? What’s a social enterprise? Is social entrepreneur a state of mind, like insanity? Are we just a bunch of granola eating, tree hugging folks who light candles, sing songs, do yoga, buy cage free eggs, listen to U2, and complain that corporations make too much money? I’ll tell you one thing, I am not one of those people. Greed IS good AND, GREEN is GOOD. CSR is GOOD. Intention…, is good. Action…., that’s a different story. Actions speak much more loudly than words. People, let me say something. In my opinion and experience so far, I’ve see way too much talk of doing, and not enough doing. Now that I think about it though, Tom Friedman might be onto something here. Perhaps the economic downturn is the end of this social entrepreneurship movement. Why? People are afraid. As a wealth manager, I can tell you that fear of loss is the number one concern of the wealthy. No matter how much money you have, fear continues to be a major concern among people. While the prospect of going bankrupt might not be a concern, there’s a very real possibility that one’s lifestyle could be altered. When it comes to emotions, many people view change as a win/lose proposition. If I don’t have to alter my lifestyle, I win. If I am forced to change the way I live, I lose. I would tend to agree with that assessment. I absolutely hate change. Before I had surgery, moving used to be my least favorite thing in the world. When change happens, and it isn’t on your terms, change sucks, excuse my French.

Robert Kiyosaki, author of the best selling book “Rich Dad, Poor Dad” said something I have always liked. He said that his definition of “wealthy”, was “the ability to continue to pay yourself if you decide to stop working”, or something close to that. Some have described this scenario as “escaping the rat race”, or being “financially independent”. In reality, I think my friend Randy Ottinger of LMR Advisors in Seattle said it best in his book, “Beyond Success: Building a Personal, Financial, and Philanthropic Legacy” McGraw Hill 2008. Randy interviewed some of top minds in business and philanthropy including Bill Gates, Sr., Jeff Brotman of Costco, and Sandy Weill, former Chairman of Citigroup. Randy discusses the concept of a moving “Wealth Divide”. This divide is the concept of the conversation around the question “How much is enough?” We as human beings are hunter gatherers and are wired to want more and accumulate for those long winter months (like the current economic winter we’re in now) . Call it “keeping up with the Jones’s”, call it whatever you like. The fact remains, that we all have these fears about coming to the Wealth Divide, looking across, making the leap, and falling flat on our face. Until we recognize that this Wealth Divide is a moving target for many people, and come to understand that money and wealth do not make us happy, we will continue to live in fear that we will lose what we have. The net result of this fear is that our social entrepreneurial “movement” will continue to be just talk, eventually be flushed down the pages of history by free market capitalism (which is really working well at the moment isn’t it?), dismissed as another promising social experiment gone awry.

“My social entrepreneurial friends”, (can I pull a McCain here?) let me speak honestly with you for a moment as someone who has a little experience in this whole wealth management thing and understands a little thing about this whole planning and economic situation we are in. This is an intervention. I’m doing this because I love you and because you are sick. If you’ve ever watched the television show, “Intervention” on A&E, the main interventionist’s (is that a word?) name is Jeff VanVonderen and he is blatantly blunt with folks who are at rock bottom. Addicts don’t like change, but then he asks “How’s that workin for you?”. Usually the answer is, “not so good, right?” Are you happy? Are you truly doing what you want to be doing? Are you talking about social entrepreneurship, saying “someday I’ll do that”, or “I’m not smart enough”, or “I don’t have time for that”. If you are, let me ask you, “how’s that workin for ya?” You want to change? You want to do something good for this world? STOP SAYING SOMETIME, SOMEDAY. Understand you will never have enough money to make you happy and that happiness comes from DOING, not HAVING. Money is just a means to an end, not the end itself. Happiness comes from pursuing dreams and goals and things that seem crazy. If you doubt me, visit my friend Gail Lynne Goodwin’s site and read about her “Global Hugs Tour”. You think she’s happy?

This is YOUR intervention. FLASH!

Tomorrow, you visit your doctor and he tells you that you have a rare medical condition and that you only have 6 months to live. First assignment, right now, write your own eulogy. Take 30 seconds and think about what you want people to say about you as they put you into the ground…Go ahead, I’ll wait.

Great, are you living life that way now or are there any things that are left undone in your life that you would want to resolve before they cover you with 6 feet of dirt? While you may have created a lot of money in business and been a great entrepreneur, how about your family? Might you want to spend more time with them before you die? Than why aren’t you doing it now? What is the purpose of your work? Is it to provide? How much? When does more time with the family come? Where does the volunteering ever happen? When does “retirement” happen for you? Oh, so you’re one of those who will never retire cause you don’t want to be bored out of your mind and have your brain turn to mush watching TV shows on Hulu huh? So you work cause you don’t want to be bored huh? Sounds like fear to me? Fear of, say,…. loss of purpose? Ringing a bell anyone? I’ll ask you again, are you happy? How’s that fear thing workin for ya? Any family stress because Daddy is never home and always stressed when he is? That’s not you right? Perhaps watching The Last Lecture again is what you folks need.

My “budding social entrepreneurial friends”, this is YOUR intervention. I had a dream. That dream was helping to turn successful business owners into social entrepreneurs. So far, this has been just a dream because while I’m here, you are still there with your talk, talk, talk. If any of you have been “successful” in your “day job” and actually wish to do something with your life greater than earning a profit, let me know. I don’t work miracles, but more than likely, I can help design and manage the financial extrication strategy that you are fearing and keeping you living in your unfulfilled, profit motivated, life of “sometime, someday” I’ll have enough. Today is the day. END RANT/ END INTERVENTION DO YOU FOLLOW ME?

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Filed under A WORK IN PROGRESS, ECONOMY, FINANCIAL PLANNING, LIFE, NON-PROFIT & CHARITY, SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Tune In To Hear Me Interviewed On The “E-Factor”- Tuesday, March 18th, Noon Eastern Time

I’m about to be interviewed on the E-Factor. I invite you to listen in and be part of it! The date will be next Tuesday, March 18th, at noon, Eastern Time (11:00 AM Central, 10:00 AM Mountain, 9:00 AM Pacific). Read below to find out more.

E-Factor is the popular bi-weekly, 60-minute conference call show, which explores the mindset of success, and the people who make success a reality. These are ordinary people from all walks of life, who do extraordinary things. They have become masters at who they are, what they do, and on this show, these remarkable people share their inspirational stories and secrets to help you create success in your own life.

E is for energy – the Energy of Success.

NEXT ON THE E-FACTOR: TUESDAY, MARCH 18TH

Personal Wealth: (an interview with Personal Chief Financial Officer and Coach, Rich Krasney)

For some, insight comes from overcoming a tragedy, or some other monumental life event that causes them to see life differently than they had before. For Rich Krasney, it came from reading a book.

About a year ago, this Personal Chief Financial Officer and Coach for a select group of business owners and entrepreneurs read Napoleon Hill’s “Think and Grow Rich”, and experienced an “Aha” moment, seeing his life purpose clearly for the first time. 

He realized that money is simply a means to an end, and as a result he now delivers his message of “How Money Can Buy Happiness: Balancing Life and Wealth” to audiences (including the Napoleon Hill Foundation, itself). Additionally, Rich is currently in the midst of developing “A Work in Progress”, a documentary exploring how one person can make a difference, and the creation of a new charity.

Dial in to the E-Factor on Tuesday, March 18th to hear why Rich now sees inspirational messages everywhere, and how in being of earnest service to others, you best serve yourself. 

Go to http://www.the-efactor.com/ to register for the call!

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